Craft of Preaching

Never Empty

Dear Working Preachers, last week, taking a cue from Matthew 11:28, "Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give

Where's the Arc?

I’m not saying Jesus was a bad preacher.

I am saying that one of the traditional styles of 1st century, Middle Eastern preaching that he used would

Tending the Vineyard

Dear Working Preachers,

This past week, Walter Brueggemann was on the Luther Seminary campus giving the inaugural presentations for the Fretheim Lecture

Generosity Sightings

Dear Working Preachers,

“Are you envious because I am generous?” reads the latter section of 20:15 in this Sunday’s parable

When a Miracle is More Than a Miracle

Dear Working Preachers,

Think about it. How many of Jesus’ miracles are recorded in all four Gospels? Let’s count. It shouldn’t take

Inviting a Kingdom Imagination

Anyone out there tired of parables yet?

To be honest, Matthew’s plethora of parables is perhaps my biggest problem when it comes to the first Gospel.

Wheat and Tares and Other Truths about the Kingdom of Heaven

Dear Working Preachers,

Good and evil side by side, co-existing without set checks and balances, without resolute criteria for adjudicating which is which,

Mustard Seed Parable: A Gardener's Take

Have you ever seen a mustard plant?

It is, after all, a plant of some biblical note. Namely, that it is the “greatest of shrubs,” and so large,

The Pharisee, the Tax Collector, and the Reformation

Dear Working Preacher,

 

I’ve long thought that the parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector made a much better Reformation Day text than

What Money Can and Can't Do

Dear Working Preacher,

 

It’s not about the money. Not in this parable or in life.

 

Let’s start with the parable. Jesus doesn’t

Beyond Righteousness

Dear Working Preacher,

There's a tragedy unfolding in this week's gospel reading that's easy to miss. It's a tragedy that doesn't occur only among the

Desperate

Dear Working Preacher,

Narrative time bombs.

That's what Eugene Peterson once described parables as, and I think he's right. Which is what can make reading